Category: Leigh Demoss

Sacrificial gratitude

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You’re not likely to find thankfulness paired with stories of sacrifice in your average candy and greeting card aisle (where gratitude is thought to live). But out in the byways of real life, a grateful heart must often strap on sword and shield, summon up its deepest courage, and brace itself for battle.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Silent gratitude

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Gratitude is not the quiet game. It begs to be expressed, both to God and to others. “Silent gratitude,” Gladys Berthe Stern said, “isn’t much use to anyone.”

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Contagious in the home

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Ingratitude is toxic. It poisons the atmosphere in our homes and workplaces. It contaminates hearts and relationships. Moms and dads can break the spirits of their children with it, and husbands and wives can deaden every sensitive emotion in the mate they once swore at a church altar to love and to cherish from that day forward. We can be obsessive about spritzing away the disease-carrying, odor-causing bacteria from our tables and countertops, but nothing is more contagious in our homes than an ungrateful spirit.

Well, maybe one thing is.

Gratitude, I’d say, is equally as contagious as its evil twin. If you’re sick and tired of living in a home where all the joy and beauty has been sucked out through negative, unappreciative words and attitudes, you can make a change. You can become the kind of person you’ve always wanted to be around. The kind of person who makes the Jesus and His gospel winsome to all who come within the reach of your grateful, “happy spirit.”

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Lepers blessing

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True story. A church group from New Bern, North Carolina, had traveled to the Caribbean on a mission trip. As you probably know, the conditions at the posh, luxury resorts are a far cry from the impoverished way of life endured by many others on these tropical islands. During this particular ministry trip, their host took them to visit a leper colony on the island of Tobago. And while there, they held a worship service in the campus chapel. As you can imagine, the sight of emaciated lepers filing into their seats on the bare pews bore deeply into the minds and memories of each visitor to this unaccustomed scene. But no memory left its mark like this one: When the pastor announced, “We have time for one more hymn. Does anyone have a favorite?” he noticed a lone patient seated awkwardly on the back row, facing away from the front. At this final call for hymn requests, with great effort, the woman slowly turned her body in the pastor’s direction. “Body” would perhaps be a generous description of what remained of hers. No nose. No lips. Just bare teeth, askew within a chalky skull. She raised her bony nub of an arm (no hand) to see if she might be called on to appeal for her favorite song to be sung. Her teeth moved to the croaky rhythm of her voice as she said, “Could we sing ‘Count Your Many Blessings’?”

The pastor stumbled out of the pulpit, out the door, and into the adjoining yard, tears of holy conviction raining down his face. One of the traveling party rushed to fill his place, beginning to sing the familiar song in this unfamiliar place, arguably the most “unblessed” of any spot in the universe. A friend hustled outside, put his arm around the sobbing pastor, and consolingly said, “I’ll bet you’ll never be able to sing that song again, will you?” “Yeah, I’ll sing it,” the pastor answered, “but never the same way, ever again.” 7 Leave it to a grotesquely deformed leper to remind us that grateful people are characterized by grateful words, while ungrateful people are given to griping, complaining, murmuring, whining.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Website: http://www.joemckeever.com/mt/archives/000358. html.

My rights

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Ungrateful people tend to hold tightly to their rights. And when others fail to perform the way they want or expect them to, they feel justified in making demands and retaliating emotionally.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Overjoyed to be alive

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Steve Dale, a syndicated columnist who answers people’s questions about their pets, received an email from someone seeking advice on what to do with her twelve-year-old boxer that had a large tumor on his leg. Two different veterinarians had agreed that the tumor needed to be removed, but admitted that doing so would require the loss of the dog’s leg. “Any advice?” the letter writer asked. Dale responded that three-legged dogs actually seem to adjust fairly quickly after surgery, and are soon getting around just about as well as before, fetching balls and terrorizing squirrels. “The psychological trauma of being expected to feel sad because they’ve lost a limb just doesn’t seem to occur. Instead, quite the reverse, they act overjoyed To be alive

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Satisfaction fuel

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Ungrateful people are much like a container that has a hole in it, leaking out every blessing that’s been poured in, always needing something else, something new to consume for satisfaction fuel.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Blessing others or gratifying yourself

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Grateful people are loving people who seek to bless others, while ungrateful people are bent on gratifying themselves. They tend to focus on “my needs,” “my hurts,” “my feelings,” “my desires,” “how I have been treated, neglected, failed, or wounded.” An unthankful person is full of himself, seldom pausing to consider the needs and feelings of others.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Pride the father of ingratitude

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Henry Ward Beecher was right when he observed, “A proud man is seldom a grateful man, for he never thinks he gets as much as he deserves.” Pride is the father of ingratitude and the silent killer of gratitude.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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