Category: R.C. Sproul

We human beings do have

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We human beings do have the natural ability, however, to make choices. We have been given the necessary natural equipment. We have a mind that can process information and understand the obligations imposed by the Law of God. We have a will that enables us to choose what we want to do. Prior to the Fall we also had a good intention, enabling us to choose the good. It is precisely this inclination to the good that was lost in the Fall. Original sin does not destroy our humanity or our ability to make choices. The natural ability or faculty remains intact. What was lost is the good intention or righteous desire for obedience. The unregenerate person is not inclined to obey God. He has no love for God that stirs his will to choose God.

R.C. Sproul

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From the book "What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics"

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Reformed theology understand the golden

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Reformed theology understand the golden chain as follows: From all eternity God foreknew the elect. He had an idea of their identity in His mind before He created them. He foreknew them not only in the sense of having a prior idea of their identities, but also of foreloving them. When the Bible speaks of “knowing”, it often distinguishes between a simple mental awareness of a person and a deep intimate love of a person. The Reformed view teaches that all whom God has foreknown, He has also predestined to be inwardly called, justified and glorified. God sovereignly brings to pass the salvation of His elect and only of His elect.

R.C. Sproul

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From the book "What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics"

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People reject the natural knowledge

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People reject the natural knowledge of God, This rejection, however, does not annihilate either the revelation or the knowledge itself. The sin of mankind is in refusing to acknowledge the knowledge that they have. They act against the truth that God reveals and they clearly receive

R.C. Sproul

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From the book "What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics"

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Reformed theology indeed insists that

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Reformed theology indeed insists that a real measure of freedom has been assigned to man by the Creator. But that freedom is not absolute and man is not autonomous. Our freedom is always and everywhere limited by God’s sovereignty. God is free and we are free. But God is more free than we are. When our freedom bumps against God’s sovereignty, our freedom must yield.

R.C. Sproul

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From the book "What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics"

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Propitiation refers to Christ’s satisfaction

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Propitiation refers to Christ’s satisfaction of God’s justice, making it “propitious” for God to forgive us. Propitiation may be seen as a vertical act of Christ directed to the Father. At the same time, Christ is an expiation for our sins, removing or carrying away from us our sins.

R.C. Sproul

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From the book "What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics"

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In the fourth century the

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In the fourth century the church faced a new heresy cloaked in a different form of monarchianism, called dynamic monarchianism. It was “dynamic” in that involved a kind of movement or change. In this view Jesus was not eternal God, but he “became” God via adoption. This view was championed by Arius.

R.C. Sproul

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From the book "What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics"

Available on amazon.co.uk*

Available on amazon.com*

Available on amazon.com.au*