Category: Tim Chester

Son of man came to….

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Tim ChesterThere are three ways the New Testament completes the sentence, “The Son of Man came . . .” “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mark 10:45); “The Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost” (Luke 19:10); “The Son of Man has come eating and drinking . . .”
(Luke 7:34).
The first two are statements of purpose. Why did Jesus come? He came to serve, to give his life as a ransom, to seek and save the lost. The third is a statement of method. How did Jesus come? He came eating and drinking.

“Son of Man” is Daniel’s label for one who comes before God to receive authority over the nations (Daniel 7). And now Jesus, the Son of Man, has come. But how does he come? Does he come with an army of angels? Does he come on the clouds of heaven? Does he come with a blaze of glory? No, he comes “eating and drinking.”
The Jews of Jesus’s day would have said the Son of Man will come to vindicate the righteous and defeat God’s enemies. They didn’t expect him to come to seek and save the lost. And they would have said the Son of Man will come in glory and power. They would never have said he would come eating and drinking.
And Luke is not talking about just subsistence eating and drinking. Jesus says: “The Son of Man has come eating and drinking, and you say, ‘Look at him! A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’” (7:34). A glutton, of course, is someone who eats too much, and a drunkard is someone who drinks too much. Jesus was seriously into eating and drinking—so much so that his enemies accused him of doing it to excess. Earlier in Luke’s
Gospel the Pharisees and their scribes said to him, “The disciples of John fast often and offer prayers, and so do the disciples of the Pharisees, but yours eat and drink” (5:33). Jesus spent his time eating and drinking—a lot of his time. He was a party animal. His mission strategy was a long meal, stretching into the evening. He did evangelism and discipleship round a table with some grilled fish, a loaf of bread, and a pitcher of wine.
Luke’s Gospel is full of stories of Jesus eating with people:
• In Luke 5 Jesus eats with tax collectors and sinners at the home of Levi.
• In Luke 7 Jesus is anointed at the home of Simon the Pharisee during a meal.
• In Luke 9 Jesus feeds the five thousand.
• In Luke 10 Jesus eats in the home of Martha and Mary.
• In Luke 11 Jesus condemns the Pharisees and teachers of the law at a meal.
• In Luke 14 Jesus is at a meal when he urges people to invite the poor to their meals rather than their friends.
• In Luke 19 Jesus invites himself to dinner with Zacchaeus.
• In Luke 22 we have the account of the Last Supper.
• In Luke 24 the risen Christ has a meal with the two disciples in Emmaus, and then later eats fish with the disciples in Jerusalem.
Robert Karris concludes: “In Luke’s Gospel Jesus is either going to a meal, at a meal, or coming from a meal.”

Tim Chester

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From the book "A Meal With Jesus"

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US Christians and dieting

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Tim ChesterAmericans spend over $50 billion on dieting each year —$50 billion to solve the problem of food gone wrong. At any given moment 25 percent of American men and
45 percent of women are dieting. Only 9 percent of college-aged women have never tried to control their weight through dieting. American Christians spend more on dieting than on world missions. We spend more curing our overconsumption than we do feeding the physically and spiritually hungry of the world. We express who we want to be through food. And when things go wrong, food becomes a place of refuge. The brokenhearted console themselves on the sofa
with a tub of ice cream. You are what you eat, people say. Food is so much more than fuel.

Tim Chester

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From the book "A Meal With Jesus"

Available on amazon.co.uk*

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Bonding over food

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Tim ChesterThink about your dining room or kitchen table. What dramas have been played out around this simple piece of furniture? Day by day you’ve chatted with your family, sharing news, telling stories, and poking fun. Values have been imbibed. Guests have been welcomed. People have found a home. Love has blossomed. Perhaps you reached across the table to take the hand of your beloved for the first time. Perhaps you remember important decisions made round the table. Perhaps you were reconciled with another over a meal. Perhaps your family still bonds by laughing at the time you forgot to add sugar to your cake

Tim Chester

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From the book "A Meal With Jesus"

Available on amazon.co.uk*

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Available on amazon.com.au*


food matters

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Food matters. Meals matter. Meals are full of significance. “Few acts are more expressive of companionship than the shared meal. . . . Someone with whom we share food is likely to be our friend, or well on the way to becoming one.”
The word “companion” comes from the Latin “cum” (“together”) and “panis” (“bread”).

Tim Chester

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From the book "A Meal With Jesus"

Available on amazon.co.uk*

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Available on amazon.com.au*


Much of the devotional literature

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Much of the devotional literature on prayer is focused on those things which help us to pray – posture, exercises, liturgies, habits. But, while they may be helpful, none of them is necessary. The focus of the Bible is instead on Christ and his sufficiency. There is nothing we can do to make our prayers more effective before God. Any such notions are a return to paganism – it is to suppose that we can manipulate or placate God. As Ronald Dunn puts it, the floor of the throne room is sprinkled, ‘not with the sweat of my good works, but with the of his sacrifice’. The ‘posture’ that the Bible commends is a humble and contrite heart

Tim Chester

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From the book "The Message of Prayer: Approaching The Throne Of Grace (The Bible Speaks Today Themes)"

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