Tag: ingratitude

Contagious in the home

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Ingratitude is toxic. It poisons the atmosphere in our homes and workplaces. It contaminates hearts and relationships. Moms and dads can break the spirits of their children with it, and husbands and wives can deaden every sensitive emotion in the mate they once swore at a church altar to love and to cherish from that day forward. We can be obsessive about spritzing away the disease-carrying, odor-causing bacteria from our tables and countertops, but nothing is more contagious in our homes than an ungrateful spirit.

Well, maybe one thing is.

Gratitude, I’d say, is equally as contagious as its evil twin. If you’re sick and tired of living in a home where all the joy and beauty has been sucked out through negative, unappreciative words and attitudes, you can make a change. You can become the kind of person you’ve always wanted to be around. The kind of person who makes the Jesus and His gospel winsome to all who come within the reach of your grateful, “happy spirit.”

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Ungrateful

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Reminds me of the story of two old friends who happened upon each other at the store one day. One of the men was obviously in a foul, depressed mood, not even able to work up a weak smile to celebrate this chance encounter with a face and voice from his past. “What’s the trouble, buddy?” the other man asked. “Oh, let me tell you, my uncle died three weeks ago and left me $ 40,000.” “Really?” “Yeah, then the week after that, a cousin I hardly even knew died and left me $ 85,000. Then last week, one of my great-aunts passed away and left me a quarter of a million dollars.” “You’ve got to be kidding me?” his friend exclaimed. “Then why the long face?” “This week … nothing!”

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Root of so many problems

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After decades of ministry to hurting people, I have come to believe that a failure to give thanks is at the heart of much, if not most, of the sense of gloom, despair, and despondency that is so pervasive even among believers today. I believe many of the sins that are plaguing and devastating our society can be traced back to that persistent root of unthankfulness that often goes undetected.

Nancy Leigh DeMoss

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Chronic mood

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One thing is indisputable: the chronic mood of looking longingly at what we have not, or thankfully at what we have, realizes two very different types of character.

Lucy C Smith

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entitlement leads to ingratitude

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When we take simple blessings for granted as if they were owed to us, or conversely, when we start to think that our house, our car, our wardrobe, or our general station in life is beneath what we deserve, ingratitude finds all the oxygen it needs to survive.

Nancy Demoss

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Needs met illegitimately

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“An ungrateful person,” Dr. D. James Kennedy pointed out regarding this passage in Romans, “is only one step away from getting his or her needs met in illegitimate ways.”

Nancy Demoss

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Ingratitude a tap root sin

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Ingratitude is the taproot out of which grows a host of other sins. And if we don’t put the axe to that root, we provide Satan with a wide, vacant lot on which to set up his little shop of horrors in our hearts. Do you think I might be overstating the case a bit? Well, when you think of the first chapter of Romans, what comes to mind? You may remember that in the opening paragraphs of this letter Paul talks about the “wrath of God” being revealed against the “unrighteousness of men” (v. 18). He lists “all manner of unrighteousness, evil, covetousness, malice” (v. 29), and a horde of other sins, including homosexual perversion and its acceptance and approval in a culture–just about every awful thing you can imagine.

Nancy Demoss

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Ingratitude not a presenting issue?

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Still, it would surprise me to think that you woke up this morning saying, “My, if I could just be a more thankful person, my life would be so much better.” Lack of gratitude rarely presents itself as a source of our problems. Yet I wouldn’t be surprised if you’ve been thinking to yourself lately, “I’m tired of my husband being so inconsiderate of me. I work nonstop to be sure his needs are met, and he gives me so little back in return. I wish just once he would stop and realize that there are other people besides him in this house who have needs.” Or perhaps, “I’ve given my parents every opportunity to apologize for putting me in a situation where I was abused as a child. A simple ‘I’m sorry’ would help. But all I ever get are excuses and rationalizations, always passing the blame onto someone else. I just want them to care. I want them to acknowledge how hard this has been to live with and how much it has cost me. Why can’t they see that?” Or, “Honestly, I’m not sure I even know what I believe anymore. I’ve lost all desire to pray, or read the Bible, or serve the Lord in any of the ways I used to. It just doesn’t do it for me anymore. Going to church is a chore. All that spiritual zeal I used to have–people must have thought I was crazy. Maybe I was. I think everybody would be a whole lot better off if they just didn’t let God get their hopes up.” I don’t have to tell you that life hurts. If it’s not one of these few examples I’ve given, it’s a difficult child, a frustrating job, a serious (or perhaps just suspicious) medical issue, an in-law impasse. It could be a bad credit rating, a sleep problem, a lingering sin habit, maybe something as life-altering as a long, drawn-out divorce. Big. Small. Long-term. Everyday. There are so many things about our individual life experiences that occupy our thoughts, feed our fears, and add to our worries. Whether we’re out driving somewhere, or trying to sneak a nap, or attempting to pay attention to the pastor’s sermon, all this “yuck” hangs on us like a spider web we can’t seem to brush off.

Nancy Demoss

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