Tag: repentance

Forgivess the standard

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Forgiveness also restores the standard in our lives. I remember one time when our kids were all teenagers. I became angry with Kathy in front
of them and then treated her disrespectfully. The next day I gathered the kids together in the front room and asked Kathy and each of the kids to forgive me. They all did, and we went on with our day. About a week later one of our boys came in the kitchen and started being sarcastic with Kathy. I walked in and told him that he didn’t have permission to talk to my wife like that.
He said,”You were rude to Mom the other day yourself!” I said, “Yes, but you forgave me. Forgiveness restores the standard.
When you forgave me, you gave away your right to act that same way because your forgiveness restored me back to the place of honor. I
repented. Repentance means, “to be restored to the pinnacle, the high place.”

He told his mother that he was sorry and she forgave him. If we don’t understand this principle, then the lowest point, the worst mistake, or the stupidest thing we have ever done in life becomes our high watermark. For instance, if we were immoral as a teenager and later on in life we have teenagers ourselves, we won’t have confidence to correct them for their poor sexual choices because we failed ourselves. Failures we have repented of are no longer the standard that we must bow to. When we asked God and those we have hurt to forgive us, we were set back up to the high place that God assigned to us. Otherwise, the worst day of our life becomes the highest place that we have the right to lead others to. The truth is that forgiveness restores the standard of holiness in us and through us.

Kris Vallotton

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From the book "The Supernatural Ways Of Royalty"

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Repent

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As church leaders we often encounter strong resistance when we day repent because of its unfortunate association with negative messages of condemnation without grace. Our people will respond differently when they realise that metanoia simply means a change of heart that shows up in a lifestyle or behaviour change.

Mike Breen

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From the book "Building A Discipling Culture"

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Repairing the past

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What are the chief responses to a past so full of things, that, if one is not careful, can weigh us down and make the long race of life a difficult journey? The Biblical people had at least four answers to this question. The way of repentance, the discipline of forgiveness, the life of gratitude and the search for wisdom.

Gordon McDonald

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From the book "A Resilient Life"

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Deep cleansing

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If there is an area of darkness in your life in which you may have received forgiveness but have not sensed the deep cleansing of the shame that you feel, you may want to find a trusted prayer partner to pray with you. “Confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another, so that you may be healed. The effective prayer of a righteous man can accomplish much” (James 5: 16).

Jack Frost

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When a handyman lays a

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When a handyman lays a floor, he knows the first row of tiles is the most important. If those are off just slightly, the floor will look worse and worse as he continues to build it. Eventually it has to be completely redone. By ignoring God’s call to realign the first row of tiles, we end u having to have our entire life pulled up and relaid. Sensible Christians know this and keep a short account with God,. They constantly repent for their sin and open themselves up to his Subtle touch. Hundreds of small adjustments are better than six really big changes. Being taken behind the woodshed by God is never fun.

Graham Cooke

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From the book "Approaching the Heart of Prophecy (Prophetic Equipping Series)"

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Prussian king Frederick the Great

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Prussian king Frederick the Great was once touring a Berlin prison. The prisoners fell on their knees before him to proclaim their innocence—except for one man, who remained silent. Frederick called to him, "Why are you here?" "Armed robbery, Your Majesty," was the reply. "And are you guilty?" "Yes indeed, Your Majesty, I deserve my punishment." Frederick then summoned the jailer and ordered him, "Release this guilty wretch at once. I will not have him kept in this prison where he will corrupt all the fine innocent people who occupy it."

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